Satan In The Light

“I saw the torments of hell and those of purgatory; no words can describe them. Had poor mortals the faintest idea of them, they would suffer a thousand deaths rather than undergo the least of their torments during a single day.”

— St. Catherine of Siena

devil cloakedModernism is the coming together of many heresies, but if you look carefully you will see that they all share a disbelief in, or disdain of, the supernatural.  The supernatural, of course, is the belief in angels and devils, heaven and hell, sin and salvation.  It is composed of that which is above the natural, that which we can feel only with the soul, and know only through the highest of reason.

Many moderns believe these unseen matters to be foolishness, ignorance, and in so doing they distance themselves from them, endangering their soul for the sake of honor and pride, for the satisfaction of thinking they are the highest authority over their own lives.

Looking at these latest scandals in the Church is to see this principle in action.  If someone believed in heaven and hell, sin and salvation, would they commit these awful sins for years? Would they do so without remorse, without removing themselves from occasions of sin, without recognizing that they are on the path to Hell?  It is hard to believe, but the fact is that once you cut yourself off from supernatural truth, you are simply an unprotected soul behind enemy lines.

Continue reading “Satan In The Light”

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On Suffering

medieval suff

Transmute the poor bread of my life into your life;

thrill the wine of my wasted life into your divine Spirit;

unite my broken heart with your Heart;

change my cross into a crucifix.

Let not my abandonment and my sorrow go to waste.

Gather up the fragments,

and as the drop of water is absorbed by the wine

at the Offertory of the Mass, let my life be absorbed in you.

Let my little cross be entwined with your great Cross

so that I may purchase the joys of everlasting happiness

in union with you.

— Bishop Fulton J. Sheen

A Choice Against Creation

The events in Ireland this week have been much discussed. While there are a thousand perspectives on it, though, one truth cannot be denied: Abortion is an unnatural act. That is to say, it is literally an act against creation, and writ large it exposes a terrible failure of humanity itself.  We have so distanced ourselves from the nature of God that we, collectively, think we can deny it, blind ourselves to it, overrule it.  But we cannot, and the evidence of that fact is everywhere, if we care to look for it.

creation2God is ever creating the universe and we are all a part of that.  Creation, after all, was not just In The Beginning but is also now, right now.  The unmoved mover by His stillness keeps everything in motion, alive, creating, being.  From atoms to the universe itself, everything is in movement.  It is ingredient in the nature of things, ingredient in the world we live in, clear from the simple observation of creation.

God’s infiniteness cannot be constrained by His stillness, for it is infinite, so instead it drives all that is around Him, all that He has created and is creating now.  God Is.  He Himself said to Moses: “I AM WHO AM.  Thus shalt thou say to the children of Israel: HE WHO IS, hath sent me to you.” And that is the key point of the matter.  It is not central that He was Creator, it is central that His is Creating now.

In this whirlwind of motion, of being, of infinite infiniteness He created all of us, individually. Human beings are special. They are not like the animals, not even like the angels. We are a part of a great experiment called Free Will. Infused by God with a soul at the moment of our creation, we each represent a facet of the infiniteness of God. A unique sliver of the everything that God is, we were put into the world to cope, thrive, suffer and, eventually, exist forever. Every finite human being is connected to God in their soul, and by God to everyone else.

All of this is to say we are all children of God, he is the Father of Creation—not just the creation back then, but the creation of this moment. As such, in such a whirlwind of divine fecundity, how could we die?  Alas we cannot. We too are eternal, not infinite, but eternal.  We can return to our Maker during this life and recognize Him or we can freely reject Him.  All of our choices decide the matter. All of our attitudes. All of what we Will during this time we are given, this time we are tested.

It is in this perspective that the matter of taking an innocent life must be viewed. In the midst of a universe of creation, of motion, of love, of endless moments alive with life, it is a choice to end another’s earthly existence.  It is a choice to go against the movement of God, the instinct to create, to move, to dance, to live, to love.

The life ended, on this plane of existence, is violently treated but it is eternal.  But the simple fact that we can offer such a choice, given what we have been told and shown for so long, is even more unthinkable and unnatural.  It is a rejection of the God that Is. Nature is demonstrating to us how to be, hinting, prodding, revealing. To end an innocent human life is to reject these messages, to deny the nature of creation that moves like a wind around us.

The sad vote in Ireland last week shows we are much farther from where we are supposed to be than we can even imagine.

 

Printed simultaneously in the Traditian Order and Traditium.

So You Seek A Miracle?

Fatima PaperOn October 13, 1917, your great, great grandfather and grandmother sat together on a sofa somewhere in the world as a miracle was filling the skies in Portugal.  In the days that followed they heard the news, practically everyone worldwide heard the news, that a genuine miracle had occurred, and the most unlikely thing had happened.

The sun had danced around the sky and been witnessed by a crowd of between 30,000 and 100,000 people, including media, there to see it.  It was, in many ways, the biggest news story in the world.  To repeat: The sun had danced around the sky.  Is it possible?  It would hardly have been a miracle if it was possible.  Did it happen?  There is no court system in the world that does not allow witnesses to establish truth.  There were thousands of witnesses.  The sun had danced around the sky.

What could lead to such an event?
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No Tradition Without Mystics

StDominicIt is almost a reflex.  A mystic is a leftist, a radical, a danger.  Unpredictable during their life, and acceptable only after their death when it is sure that they will no longer say anything outlandish or unpredictable, mystics are to be embraced only after much time has passed.

Equally reflexive is the idea that mindfulness, that is the ability to see the present moment, through the cloud of ego and with any clarity at all, is completely a Buddhist occupation.  Or Eastern at least.  Or scary.  Best castigated for a few centuries until it is clear that it is safe to favor it in some way.

How radical, how anti-traditionalist, how very novel, would it be to say that it is the traditional Catholic Church that is the best proponent of clarity, the best antagonist  against the vagaries of ego and its many lies and deceptions, the best of the West, without the least need to nod to the East.   It is our tradition to fight the untrustworthy ego, to embrace the rough mystic, to take as our own the truth wherever it might be as our own, then to sort out over time how the pieces fit together.

They are not, though, always so far afield.  Within the great traditions of Western Culture are the truths that can nourish and sustain.  The frenzied desperation of believing in self alone offers no peace, and each individual, should they consider it, knows this in their heart and soul regardless of where they were born, anywhere on the globe.

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