Tradition and Nature

PassionfruitIt is a world where the average person does not know what the plants that feed them every day even look like, a world where many would not know how to grow a beneficial herb if you handed them the seeds and pointed them to the soil, where people have stopped being responsible stewards of the environment and instead started ignorantly worshiping it. The relationship of humankind and nature is a long one, with faith-based traditions that must again be brought to the attention of the distortion-filled modern world.

With this in mind, the Traditian Order opens its page on our site containing information on nature, the environment and the politics and misinformation that surround these isssues. On our site you will now find In Horto Traditian, a page dedicated to collecting our articles and information about what the faithful have been taught, learned and need to know about nature, horticulture and environmental traditionalism (which will also be the title an August column of Traditius).  In addition, we have started up a Facebook page, also called In Horto Traditian, for discussion of these issues. Finally a guild is being formed for interested members of the Order to join to help learn, defend and pass on these traditions.

Please check out these resources and let us know what you think!

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In The Garden of Charlemagne

Medieval Horticulture, Part 2: In The Garden of Charlemagne.  A sequel to: Medieval Horticulture, Part 1: Monastic Herbalism

In 476 A.D. the Emperor Romulus Augustus was overthrown by the germanic hordes and any order that the Roman Empire had brought to Europe for centuries was finished. The fall of Rome in the west would cast the former territories of the Empire into centuries of ignorance and squalor, we are told, particularly the areas farthest from it. This is the accepted history, and it is an enormous oversimplification.

Landtag beraet ueber Klage des Freistaats gegen den Laenderfinanzausgleich
“Imperial Coronation of Charlemagne” by Friedrich Kaulbach, 1861

Just a few decades later, after all, one of the germanic tribes, the Franks, were unified under one king, named Clovis I. Unlike the other tribes, which were mainly Arian, the Franks were Catholic due to Clovis’ wife insistence and his conversion on Christmas Day in 508 A.D.. The germanic tribes would continue their chaotic rule over much of the former Empire in the west, for a time, but in 768 A.D. a man named Charles rose to lead the Franks and re-establish order. Charles would go on to conquer the other tribes, and became Holy Roman Emperor. Even during his life he was referred to as “Charles the Great” which translates in French, of course, to Charlemagne.

Continue reading “In The Garden of Charlemagne”

The Threat of Velvet Nihilism and A Novel Response

flock of birds under blue and white sky
Photo by Binh Ho Image on Pexels.com

We are living in a time of extreme social fracturing.  The variables that have led us to this condition are multifaceted, but much can be discerned by observing the post-modern penchant to limit the scope of human flourishing–through exclusively materialist conceptions of man–by advancing a limited view of freedom that idolizes radical autonomy.

This two-fold circumscription of the human person has ultimately harvested the fruits of a culture that no longer remembers the purpose for which they were created.  Ultimately, the model representation of this counterfeit anthropology—advanced by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in Casey v. Planned Parenthood—is the assertion that, “at the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life.”  This way of thinking neuters traditional cultural mores that enshrines the nuclear family, church, community, and solidarity by promoting a myopic view of human flourishing that enshrines the subjective views and experiences of the individual.

Continue reading “The Threat of Velvet Nihilism and A Novel Response”

So You Seek A Miracle?

Fatima PaperOn October 13, 1917, your great, great grandfather and grandmother sat together on a sofa somewhere in the world as a miracle was filling the skies in Portugal.  In the days that followed they heard the news, practically everyone worldwide heard the news, that a genuine miracle had occurred, and the most unlikely thing had happened.

The sun had danced around the sky and been witnessed by a crowd of between 30,000 and 100,000 people, including media, there to see it.  It was, in many ways, the biggest news story in the world.  To repeat: The sun had danced around the sky.  Is it possible?  It would hardly have been a miracle if it was possible.  Did it happen?  There is no court system in the world that does not allow witnesses to establish truth.  There were thousands of witnesses.  The sun had danced around the sky.

What could lead to such an event?
Continue reading “So You Seek A Miracle?”

Archbishop Sample on the rise of the Latin Mass among young people

In this the age of relativism, sometimes the straightforward truth is so shocking that it leaps out at you, grabs your attention, lights your soul afire.  Archbishop Sample’s plain words here are of that sort.  Truth, like St. Augustine said, is like a lion.  Just let it out and it will defend itself.  Special thanks to the Archbishop for letting out these truths this week.

The Wrath of God

When you look closely at history it’s quite odd to see the fashions of particular ages. In certain periods certain trends, certain philosophies, seem to be all the rage.  That they could believe the things they did in the past just seems ridiculous to us in our current, enlightened age.

After all, we are in an enlightened age of mercy, an age where the idea that anyone will be judged is anathema, an age where pagan and heterodox beliefs are bubbling to the surface again in the name of conforming to the age around us.  Such is tolerance.

When bathing in such waters, it is good to keep in mind, though, that God does not deal in fashions. He is fully for mercy while he is fully for justice. Indeed, both at the same time, eternally so, and without contradiction. While our age and our leaders focus on tolerance, mercy, love and acceptance, there is a part of all of us, indeed even the modernists, who know that God–while he loves all and is infinitely merciful–is also infinitely just. We live in the age of Who Am I To Judge? But God will judge. Christ was very clear, indeed, He spoke of Hell more than he spoke of most issues.

Fear of the Lord? This age might consider it a horrible thing to fear the God of Love, but it is the eternal beginning of wisdom. You cannot do as you please, make yourself God and expect to go unjudged. The times teach this, and in doing so they can deceive. You will be judged, by timeless standards, by God who has been so very clear. He may be merciful, but do not try to BE Him, do not try to take truth into your own hands, do not assume that you are in control.

History shows that there are some who write off the God of the Old Testament, or claim that He was some other God, but He was not. The Old must be reconciled with the new to find the eternal, the balance, the ageless truth. You are not God. You will be judged. Entire peoples have been judged. Who, the Hell, are you?

Soak in the age, for God is in fact mercy, God is in fact love. But do not forget that He is also, equally, justice, and judgment. Do not forget that this age is no less susceptible to fashionable philosophies than any other. The times tell us that we stand atop history, that we can create our own truth. That is the fashion. There will be a time when people look back on it and wonder how anyone could believe such a ridiculous thing.

Your eternal soul is on the line.  Pursue balance, fear God and seek wisdom.

In The Beginning . . .

CreationIf you had to pick a handful of the most controversial issues in the world, creation would have to be among them.  Was the world literally created all at once, with two people named Adam and Eve right there at Earth’s beginnings?  Or are we to read Genesis less as journalism and more as symbolism?  If there is a middle ground, what is it, and could a self-respecting traditional Catholic possibly occupy something as shaky as a middle ground?

Continued here.